Preen by Thornton Bregazzi

The urgency of the climate crisis is sharpening minds across London’s fashion community, but for this couple, implementing change is a matter of circling back to first principles. Thornton’s earliest job was working for London designer Helen Storey in the ’80s. “She had a collection called Second Life, which was made from repurposed existing fabrics—and that was my job, finding the materials, learning how to do it,” he recalls.
All Thornton and Bregazzi had to do was look in their storage space in Notting Hill to realize they had more than enough fabric to get that going again. Since their design aesthetic has involved using contrasting materials in the past few years, anyway, it was a no-brainer. “It means that some things will be limited runs—and pieces might be a bit different from one another,” said Thornton.

Photo credit: Vogue.com

The designer had composed the collection from a mix of leftover fabric from previous seasons; sustainably sourced viscose; and, in the case of some of the sheer dresses, “georgette that’s made from recycled plastic bottles and textile waste.” “What?” exclaimed one of the models backstage as Justin Thornton explained the provenance of the beige semisheer dress she was wearing. “Well, yes—I didn’t know you could get georgette from plastic either,” Thea Bregazzi replied. “We are constantly asking suppliers if there’s a more sustainable alternative to the fabrics they’re offering. Better solutions are beginning to come all the time if you look for them.”

Photo credit: Vogue.com

Nicole Miller

The designer thrives on assemblage—mixing and matching patterns and references into flirty ready-to-wear. You could pair the delicate slip dress with a pair of Doc Martens and hit the club, but the piece was also fit for a grown-up date night. See how No Name Design Studio’s designers chose to reinterpret this floral print.

Photo credit: Vogue.com

Patchwork dresses are back! Mix floral prints with little polka dots, or choose one of many patchwork prints you can find in our Gallery!

Photo credit: Vogue.com

Longchamp

This Ready-To-Wear Collection visualizes looks that follow a woman as she traverses her day, faultlessly outfitted for every occasion. She is mixing and matching pieces that resonate with her active, on-the-go lifestyle, while keeping to a sophistication that is part and parcel of Parisiennes.

Photo credit: Vogue.com

Carolina Herrera

The Herrera aesthetic? Joie de vivre. The spring 2020 show is inspired by the California super bloom: flirty, short dresses in bright floral prints. See how our designers at No Name Design Studio had chosen to reinterpet these vibes.

Photo credit: Vogue.com

Marc Jacobs

A chorus line of brilliant color, sparkle, flower prints for a ready-to-wear collection that seems inspired by the 70s. Here is one of our favourite colour palette from the catwalk.

Photo credit: Vogue.com

Gabriela Hearst

Hearst has merged the most elevated fabrics with incredible made-in-NYC handwork. With a sharp eye on luxury and longevity, Hearst presented her most artisanal collection to date featuring macrame and woven hemp details and bags nested in crochet cashmere. See how our designers at No Name Design Studio has used Hearst’ s monocrome colour palette to create a beautiful black&white print.

Photo credit: Vogue.com

Jonathan Simkhai

Jonathan Simkhai Spring/Summer 2020 Ready-To-Wear Collection- The designer’s lingerie lifestyle look added a twist to the now-ubiquitous notion of pajama dressing.

You might call it a lingerie-lifestyle look that Jonathan Simkhai has been cultivating over the nine years he’s been in business. His collection radiated feminity, showing the audience slip dresses, leather skirts, trousers, sexy bralettes. He wanted to focus more on an aesthetic look, playing with spring palette colors like tangerine, saffron yellow, coral, blue, magenta, and pink.

Photo credit: Vogue.com

Every designer has a season or theme that they want to showcase in a collection and that’s what Jonathan did. “I embody that,” he tells to Vogue. “I always feel happy in spring, and I think that that joyfulness is something I can give to the clothes.” Simkhai Spring 2020 is definitely following the development of the 1980s influences, but puts it in a context of spring. The colors are bright, pastel and as sweet as you’d expect them for a spring collection. Mint green, lavender, peach, baby blue, pink and plum are some of the colors you find.

Photo credit: Vogue.com

If you like these prints we’ve created, they’re available to purchase in our Shop section.

If you enjoyed this post, you might also enjoy browsing our gallery of fashion prints here. Also, if you need help in developing a print design for your product, check out our service of consultancy. Forward your questions at studio@nonamedesign.co.uk